Roz Kaveney (rozk) wrote,
Roz Kaveney
rozk

Not just the heat

The absence of entries from me over the last week is not just a symptom of heat-stroke and wanting it to be cold and rainy and damp that chills my bones rather than this perpetual sweat and burn and air that fills my mouth with poison. It also has to do with a vague sense of emotional paralysis combined with stress - this may be sleep-related, as in not much- and it may have to do with deadlines - work is not going well in this heat. But my apologies to all - normal service will be renewed...

In the meantime - a few notes.

Saw various lj folk - tamaranth, sbisson - on Monday at the Oxford St Borders sf meeting/reading which this month was a discussion of the abolition of the Earthlight imprint at Simon and Schuster. The point is less the imprint - there are cases on both sides for publishing with genre descriptions clearly labelled - than the sacking of editors who know what they are doing when editing genre books. It does seem to be a matter of the personal anti-predilection of the new Managing Director, who simply dislikes publishing sf and fantasy - this is also the man who forced an editor to turn down my still unpublished novel with the remark 'We have published quite enough quasi-experimental novels about sexual deviance.' Which, one day, I will put on a dust jacket along with the remark of an agent who refused to represent it - 'Beautifully written of course, but cold, heartless and amoral.'

I once repeated both these remarks to Kathy Acker, who giggled like a very small drain, at the idea that there are people out there so fogeyish that they see me as cutting edge.

The Kelly enquiry goes on - no-one seems to come out with much credit, but it is clear that, whether by pious fraud or mass hysteria, the Blair government misled us all with a case that we still did not think strong enough to justify war.

And one of the results of the heat and not going out much is that I still have not seen the pirate movie.

On the other hand, I have had to watch the DVD of The Omega Man and find it bizarre that once Heston was in movies where he opposed evil fundamentalists - well, OK, he shot a lot of them - and believed in the science and art they wanted to destroy. I suppose it was always about the gun - and the racial politics of the film are pseudo-liberal in a very modern way. Lisa, the black woman who is briefly Heston's love interest, eventually gets infected and goes over to the other side - and many of the evil albino zomboid puritans were originally black.

And yet, it is the film 28 Days Later has to beat in its shots of walking and driving around empty cities and the shock when someone you care about suddenly turns. The moment when we realize Lisa has changed is terrifying, as is the point at which Heston gets to his refuge to discover he has been betrayed by her.
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